Watch Seduction
3D Space-Age Glowing Watches for the Female Wrist: MB&F  HMX Black Badger

3D Space-Age Glowing Watches for the Female Wrist: MB&F HMX Black Badger

Unveiled earlier this year at Baselworld 2016, the new  MB&F art piece created in  cooperation with James Thompson of Black Badger Advanced Composites is a shining example of bold space-age looks in watches for women. The HMX Black Badger, part of MB&F’s Performance Art Collection, actually glows in the dark — brighter than any other watch on the market. What’s more, it’s not just the numbers or hands that glow, it’s the entire workings of the watch — in great hues of  Phantom Blue,  Purple Reign and ravishing Radar Green. The design is achieved via solid blocks of proprietary high-efficiency luminosity capable of storing energy and releasing it for a longer period of time than other luminous materials on the market. Each color way is created in a limited edition of 18 pieces  and will sell for approximately $50,000.

3D Space-Age Glowing Watches for the Female Wrist: MB&F HMX Black Badger

Unveiled earlier this year at Baselworld 2016, the new  MB&F art piece created in  cooperation with James Thompson of Black Badger Advanced Composites is a shining example of bold space-age looks in watches for women. The HMX Black Badger, part of MB&F’s Performance Art Collection, actually glows in the dark — brighter than any other watch on the market. What’s more, it’s not just the numbers or hands that glow, it’s the entire workings of the watch — in great hues of  Phantom Blue,  Purple Reign and ravishing Radar Green. The design is achieved via solid blocks of proprietary high-efficiency luminosity capable of storing energy and releasing it for a longer period of time than other luminous materials on the market. Each color way is created in a limited edition of 18 pieces  and will sell for approximately $50,000.

Meet the New Georg Jensen Vivianna Archive Collection Bangles

The newest and coolest pieces of jewelry from Georg Jensen just arrived in stores and it is a breath of fresh air. Interestingly enough, the new Vivianna bangles are inspired by jewelry from the 1960’s and ’70’s. They draw their look from the iconic designs of Torun, who used organic shapes and reflective surfaces. The new bangles are part of the Archive Collection and are crafted in polished sterling silver with cabochon stones in predate, blue topaz, amethyst and black onyx. The refreshing designs range from $395 to $1,500 and make the perfect summertime accompaniment.

Complicated Watches for Women on the Rise

  As a watch journalist, I cover all things timepieces for both men and women and this year I am thrilled to say that the watch brands are catering to the ladies. Even better: many of these  luxury watches are not just pretty faces; they are complex timepieces with in-house-made mechanical movements. Indeed, complicated mechanical timepieces are the new must-have for today’s savvy women who are prepared to spend upwards of $50,000 on the right statement piece. And, it seems, top brands continue to vie for time on the female wrist with exciting new watches that chime the time, display the moon and the stars, and offer time around the world. Roger Dubuis this year unveiled only women’s watches at SIHH. Among those introductions are the $250,000 Grand Feu enamel Excalibur Broceliande skeletonized flying tourbillon (with built-in escapements that compensate for errors in timekeeping due to the effects of gravity when the watch is in certain positions) and the Velvet Secret Heart, a bi-retrograde jumping date watch with in-house made self-winding movement retailing for $80,300. Jaeger-LeCoultre also takes a leadership position, having unveiled  an entire mechanical collection, Rendez-Vous, expressly for women three years ago. The line is regularly enhanced and today includes tourbillons, calendars and even a minute repeater for women. The same is true of the brand’s famed and iconic Reverso line, which has been joined this year by a new movement for women in the form of the  Reverso One Duetto Moon.  

A Cut Above: Why are There so Many Diamond Cuts?

  Years ago, buying a diamond was perhaps easier than it is today. You usually opted for a round brilliant or a marquise shape; they were the most popular. You didn’t think about “conflict” diamonds because you didn’t know they existed. You also didn’t worry about your diamond not being born in the Earth’s crust because lab-grown diamonds didn’t exist. Fast-forward several decades and the diamond world has changed considerably. Buying a diamond today presents some pretty interesting choices that range far beyond the usual 4 C’s of cut, color, clarity and carat weight. Today, there are a host of innovative new cuts of diamonds that complement the famed favorites and may be attracting a younger clientele. Additionally, there are lab-grown diamonds, such as Diamond Foundry –in which Leonardo DiCaprio is an investor. Is investment The role is an intriguing one, as he starred the movie Blood Diamonds that changed the diamond industry forever. First, lets address some of the interesting cuts of diamonds. As previously mentioned, round brilliant-cut diamonds are the most popular, and always have been. This is most likely because diamonds in the rough are usually small and somewhat round to begin with—lending themselves to round shapes when cut and polished. There are also marquis cut diamonds, squares, emeralds and a host of fancy shapes that generally are offshoots of the around diamond, including pears, hearts, etc. In 1902, a man by the name of Asscher perfected a cut that he described, in applying for his patent, as a “square with dramatically cut corners.” His square diamond with dramatically cut corners meant the corners were angled – offering eight sides to the diamond instead of four. Additionally, the facets graduated in a different fashion than other diamonds of the time – capturing much more light. The diamond was regal and majestic and fast became a preferred cut for the wealthy. Over the decodes, triangular cuts emerged and then, specially named cuts such as the Trilliant, the Quadrillion, the Ashoka, the Criss-cut by Christopher Designs, the Ideal cut and the Princess cut, among others. In fact, this latter cut, the Princess Cut, was developed by Israel Itzkowitz and has become the second most popular diamond cut — after the round brilliant — on the market today. It is rectangular with angles and narrow facets that allow for greater light and more optical brilliance. The same inventor of the princess cut also developed, just eight year ago, the… keep reading »